Delhi: 25,000 cops promoted, only 27 per cent cases solved

Delhi: 25,000 cops promoted, only 27 per cent cases solved
Delhi: 25,000 cops promoted, only 27 per cent cases solved

Highlights

  • 1

    Delhi Police awarded 25,000 promotions last year.

  • 2

    The force solved only around 27 per cent of all the cases it registered in 2016.

  • 3

    Officials blame this on lack of clues and CCTV cameras.

Cops in the city managed to solve only about one-fourth of the crimes reported last year, data accessed by Mail Today show, even as officers lamented the lack of CCTV cameras and clues.

The less-than-flattering statistics come against the backdrop of the Delhi Police promoting 25,000 of its personnel in 2016 to increase the number of investigators in the department.

Amulya Kumar Patnaik, who took charge as the city's top cop on Tuesday, was the man behind the move as he believes that promoting the cops will not just help in reducing pending cases but also boost the men's morale.

In 2016, granting "special grade designation", as many as 18,702 personnel were promoted- including 9,364 head constables to assistant sub-inspectors and 933 constables to head constables. 51 inspectors were also promoted to ACP, 117 sub- inspectors to inspectors and 596 ASIs to sub-inspectors. A total of 1,923 personnel were also promoted for functional requirements under the comprehensive scheme.

ONLY 55,957 OF 2,09,519 CASES SOLVED IN 2016

According to the Delhi Police data, as many as 2,09,519 cases were registered under various sections of the Indian Penal Code in 2016. Of these, cops managed to solve only 55,957 whereas the remaining 1,53,562 - or about 73.29 per cent - remained unsolved.

Most of these unsettled cases are about robbery, burglary, motor vehicle theft, snatching, etc. Compared to 2015, the crime rate in 2016 went up by 8 percentage points.

The data reveal that in 2016, a total of 4,761 robbery cases were registered, out of which 1,821 remained unsolved. Similarly, out of 14,307 burglary cases, as many as 11,902 cases remain mysteries.

Snatching incidents have always been a headache for Delhi's top cops as they present the city in bad light. In 2016, as many as 9,571 such cases were registered, out of which the police failed to solve 6,207 cases.

Also read: Amulya Kumar Patnaik is the new Delhi Police Commissioner

OFFICIALS BLAME LACK OF CCTV, CLUES

When Mail Today spoke to senior police officers, they blamed the situation on unavailability of CCTV cameras and clues. A total of 1,30,928 cases of theft including motor vehicle theft, were registered in 2016. But cops failed to solve 87 per cent of them. "Go for insurance and claim it after theft," BS Bassi, the then police commissioner, said once when the force failed to solve around 80 per cent of theft cases in 2015. He also said that if people get insurance, it will generate jobs with insurance companies.

However, Delhi Police managed to solve most cases related to dacoity, murder, rape and molestation of women.

According to the data of 2015, charge sheets have been filed in around 20 per cent of the cases. The data for 2016 are not available yet.

A senior officer said a major chunk of the police force is engaged in unaccounted work, like VVIP movement, attending to petty civil complaints and providing security to religious congregations, political protests and other local as well as school functions. This adds to the crisis while severely affecting the investigation of cases.

A report by voluntary organisation Praja Foundation claimed last year that the Delhi Police has been hit by staff crunch. The department's security wing is also responsible for keeping safe a slew of dignitaries including the President, Prime Minister, Vice-President and cabinet ministers.

Also read: Delhi police to install night cameras to catch speeding vehicles 

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